Living with Sarcopenia

Because the loss of muscle means the loss of strength and mobility, managing sarcopenia needs to be taken seriously. Sarcopenia accelerates around age 75 and is a factor in the occurrence of frailty and the likelihood of falls and fractures.

While there are still no approved treatments for sarcopenia, there are lifestyle changes you can make to help you live with this disease. These include resistance training and a nutritious diet.

Appropriate steps should also be taken to avoid falls.

The following is a story of someone living with sarcopenia.

"I was never one for joining the sports teams at school. Because I had an office-based job most of my working life, I’ve never been what you’d describe as an ‘active’ person. But, as I never smoked or drank much alcohol, I thought I was pretty healthy.

Then my husband sadly died quite young and so I found myself living alone at 60. I had always cooked well for the both of us, but with him gone I started cutting corners; eating too much toast and jam, rather than proper meals. He had always done the driving, so I didn’t get out as much. Added to which when I did go out, I didn’t feel so confident. I’d lost my balance a few times outside, on rough pavements and when it was getting dark, and I’d ended up in a heap on the ground, very embarrassed. These falls always shook me up and so I tended to try to stay in the house.

It was a stormy day in January, when a strong gust blew me over on the ice. I put my hand out to save myself and then I heard the crack as my wrist broke. It was the osteoporosis specialist nurse who suggested I ask my GP about the falls clinic. There I saw a doctor who assessed me; she arranged a bone density scan and timed my walking and ‘get-up-and-go’. From blood tests she discovered my vitamin D levels were very low, as I wasn’t getting enough sunlight. Low vitamin D was making my bones thin (osteoporosis) and my muscles weak (sarcopenia). She prescribed me tablets to replace and then maintain my vitamin D levels. She also suggested I see a dietician, as I wasn’t eating a balanced diet and had grown quite thin, as well as one of their specialist physiotherapists.

The dietician explained to me why I needed to increase my protein intake to make my muscles stronger; I now eat chicken, fish and more pulses. She also explained the need for fresh fruit and vegetables, as these are non-acid producing, as well as the calcium-rich foods for my bones.

The physiotherapist, Mark, ran a 10-week program of falls and balance classes. Here I met other ladies who had experienced falls, and together we learnt specific muscle-strengthening and balance-improving exercises. At the end Mark gave us written instructions about on-going exercises for us to do at home. It really made us feel more confident. Now I go for a walk most days, do my exercises, and have even smartened up the garden.

I understand that I have sarcopenia, and that my muscle mass and strength will continue to decline as I age, but I also know that if I keep up with my exercise plan and eat the right diet for my bones and muscles, I’m much less likely to fall and injury myself again."

Our Bone Health Advocates

Britt Ekland, Swedish actress

I am an actor and staying slim is part of the job, so like most celebrities I have been on a diet for most of my adult life. As a result, my body has been deprived of essential vitamins and nutrients, which no doubt contributed to my osteoporosis. I do worry terribly about today's female celebrities, who are even thinner than our generation was. And the worst thing is that other women feel they have to copy the people they see looking so slim in magazines and in the films.

Chalida Thaochalee, Miss Thailand 1998

I think it is particularly important for young girls and boys to exercise in order to build stronger bones to prevent osteoporosis later in life, because most people reach their peak bone density and strength in their teens and twenties. After peak bone mass is reached, bone density remains stable during adulthood and then declines with age. Weight bearing exercises are essential for building bone density and mass. However, to obtain bone benefits, exercise must be regular.

Dr. Kiran Bedi, the first woman to join the Indian Police Service, is an award-winning advocate for prison and police reform and among the most admired women in India

As police officers we have a duty to work for a secure environment. As individuals we have a similar duty to keep our health nourished. The future of India will be based on developing a generation of strong women with strong bones, which is why I’m promoting this mission to fight against osteoporosis. I plea that all women take responsibility for their bone health and learn about their osteoporosis risk factors to prevent rather than lament. Time is of essence.